Monday, January 27, 2014

The Center of it all :: Weekends with Chesterton

"Numberless modern women have rebelled against domesticity in theory because they have never known it in practice. .. . Generally speaking, the cultured class is shrieking to be let out of the decent home, just as the working class is shouting to be let into it." 
What's Wrong With the World      G.K. Chesterton
 
 

  
 
 
Matt Walsh recently wrote the article, "Stay-at-home moms: you don’t owe the world an explanation" in response to an article entitled, "I Look Down On Young Women With Husbands And Kids And I’m Not Sorry.” I am a stay at home mom by choice; in fact, I gave up a promising career in anthropology and archaeology to take up my vocation.
 
I grew up in a single parent household; my father lived in another state but was always a phone call away. It was an incredible experience where I learned how to take of myself and my younger brother and prepared me for the sacrifices that I have to make currently everyday. I remember often being amazed that parents were there to take such interest in their children's extracurricular activities or drive them somewhere. Not that my mother was completely uninterested but she was usually working or out creating her own life. So, when I read the above quote from Chesterton this past Sunday, I felt compelled to share it. When I was in elementary school, I do remember wishing for that perfect family life and think that we as a generation have lost the importance of the idea of a home where there is a strong bond and a mother that stabilizes the home.

9 comments:

  1. "They have never known it in practice" - isn't that true! Even if we grew up with a mother in the home, if she was grumbling and unhappy, or any way not enjoying her role in the family, then we didn't learn the kind of glorious domesticity Chesterton is talking about. Your picture of a beautiful cake and the icon of the Mother of God *and* flowers shows that God has given you that homey gift. It's very encouraging to me.

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    1. Your comment brightened my day and got me back on a joyful track. I agree with your comment about experiencing domesticity. We as humans are desperate for examples!

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  2. Yes! This! So many devalue the domestic, when really I think it is domestic comfort that we all long for. Feminism is such an irony,

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    1. I don't think I ever saw the irony until I had to make the choice, honestly. My mother in law, a grand ole southern belle, told me that feminism devalued marriage to her because it never allowed her the mental opportunity to learn her role as a wife and how that role was different from her husband's role.

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  3. I also grew up with a working mom, and while I don't remember resenting it or feeling unloved, I always had the notion that there was a more "homey" way to live. I have found it to be really fulfilling, even when it's hard.

    It seems so shortsighted to choose career and recreation in your twenties and thirties and so choose a life without family in your old age.

    Your little feast looks lovely!

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    1. Oh thank you. I recently found a cake book that is simple, "Vintage Cakes" by Jane Brocket.

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  4. I throughly enjoy reading your blog.You have such compassion for homemaking and homeschooling. Its beautiful. However, being a child of four and the daughter to a stay at home mother. I did choose a career and motherhood. It works for my family but I don't believe that it makes my house any less a home or me any less a womanly.

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    1. I think that intrinsically I could not do both meaning a career and motherhood because I am obsessive. I am terrible at balancing my life; I am in awe of women who can balance the home with a career, and I believe that God does in fact give certain women that grace. My mother was also not a great example of that balance unfortunately. She was very focused on her life and living it for herself that my brother and I often would only see her for an hour a day at some points. So, I went in the opposite direction. I hope you continue reading! I love to hear other's experiences!

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    2. It is quite a difficult balance needless to say! And it is true what you stated in a previous comment about your mother in law, the mother/wife's role becomes a little muddled. It can become difficult to find where one role stops and the other begins. But I have several stay at home mother friends and I have come to find that sometimes they have a tough time with that as well. I do wish I had more time to bake and clean but with house of almost 4 little ones you probably don't have much time either! :)

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